Know Your Vitamins

Chromium

Chromium is an essential mineral (it's actually a type of metal) that helps us regulate blood sugar levels. The body need chromium for normal growth and health.Although nutritionists are unsure of all the ways that chromium works to support health, it is known that a deficiency in chromium is associated with increased blood sugar, increased cholesterol levels, high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood) and a higher risk of conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. Chromium is what as known as ?an essential trace element' - which means it is needed in very small amounts for human health.

Chromium functions

  • Chromium contributes to normal macronutrient metabolism
  • Chromium contributes to the maintenance of normal blood glucose levels

Copper

It may be a ?trace? mineral (which means it's needed in only tiny amounts) but copper's role in supporting good health is formidable. Copper is required for the proper function of enzymes (proteins that helps chemical reactions to take place)involved in energy production at the cellular level. It plays a role in the formation of melanin (skin and hair pigmentation), and the formation of the connective tissues that support the heart, blood vessels and bones.

Copper Functions

  • Contributes to immune function
  • Contributes to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage
  • Contributes to maintenance of connective tissues
  • Contributes to energy-yielding metabolism
  • Contributes to normal function of the nervous system
  • Contributes to skin and hair pigmentation
  • Contributes to iron transport in the body

 

Ginseng

Ginseng is an herbal preparation derived from the root of the Panax genus of plants. Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for more than 2,000 years. This root contains active chemical compounds called ginsenosides or panaxosides, thought to be responsible for the herb's purported beneficial properties.

 Ginseng functions

  • May boost immunity
  • May reduce fatigue
  • May improve cognitive functioning
  • May help sexual function
  • May contributes to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage

Iodine

Iodine is a trace element found in seawater and soil. We need it in very small amounts to make thyroid hormones. These are the hormones that regulate our metabolism. An underactive thyroid gland slows the metabolism and causes weight gain. The thyroid is a small gland located in the front of the neck. The cells in the thyroid are the only ones capable of absorbing iodine. Thyroid cells capture iodine and combine it with tyrosine ? an amino acid ? to produce thyroid hormones that are then released into the bloodstream. When the body lacks iodine, the thyroid gland become enlarged, a condition called goitre.

Iodine functions

  • Contributes to normal thyroid function and production of thyroid hormones
  • Contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism
  • Contributes to maintenance of normal skin
  • Contributes to cognitive and neurological function

 

Iron

Iron is vital for the production of haemoglobin, the part of red blood cells that ferries oxygen throughout the body. Nearly two-thirds of the body's iron is found in haemoglobin. Iron is an essential component of dozens of enzymes ? proteins that initiate chemical reactions in the body ? including those involved in energy production and for making DNA, the cells' blueprint for reproduction. Smaller amounts of iron are found in myoglobin - the muscle's equivalent of haemoglobin. Myoglobin is a protein that transports and stores oxygen on a short-term basis within the muscles.

Iron functions

  • Contributes to the formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin
  • Contributes to normal oxygen transport in the body
  • Contributes to energy-yielding metabolism
  • Contributes to normal function of the immune system
  • Contributes to cognitive function
  • Contributes to normal cell division
  • Can contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

 

Lutein

Lutein is a carotenoid - a type of pigment that gives colour to fruit and vegetables. Lutein gets stored in the eye where it forms the yellow pigment of the retina to absorb damaging blue and near-ultraviolet light from the sun. This protects the centre of the retina(the macular) from damage. The macular gives us colour and fine visions but in doing this job it produces free radicals - rogue forms of oxygen that cause cell damage. Fortunately, Lutein is a potent antioxidant which means it helps block some of this damage.

Lutein functions

  • Contributes to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage
  • Protects the eyes from damaging near ultraviolet light.

 

Magnesium

Magnesium is the fourth-most abundant mineral in the body. Although a mere 1% of the magnesium in our bodies circulates in the bloodstream, it is needed for more than 300 reactions that take place on a constant basis. About 50% of magnesium is associated with bones, and the other half is divided among cells that make up our tissues and organs. Magnesium helps make proteins and is crucial for energy production. It also helps regulate other minerals in the body including calcium and potassium.

Magnesium functions

  • Contributes to electrolyte balance
  • Contributes to the maintenance of normal bone/teeth
  • Contributes to energy-yielding metabolism
  • Contributes to muscle function including the heart muscle
  • Contributes to nerve function
  • Contributes to protein synthesis
  • Contributes to normal cell division
  • Can contribute to a reduction of fatigue
  • Contributes to normal psychological function

 

Molybdenum

Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral (which means it is needed by the body in tiny amounts). Molybdenum assists a small number of enzymes - proteins that help chemical reactions to take place in the body. The most important of these enzymes for health is sulfite oxidase, which is involved in the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids (the building blocks of protein) making it important for normal cell function and growth. A metallic element, molybdenum is found in abundance in legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as grains. Animal-based foods as well as fruits and vegetables tend to be low in molybdenum. Molybdenum also aids the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates.

Molybdenum functions

  • Contributes to normal sulphur amino acid metabolism
  • May be involved in the development of the nervous system
  • Contributes to energy production in cells

 

Omega 3

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats (healthy fats). There are three main kinds: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). EPA and DHA support heart health. DPA may do the same but its benefits are less established.Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is another form of omega-3 fat found in plant oils. Our bodies convert ALA into EPA and DHA. Omega-3s gives cell membranes a flexible structure allowing nutrients to enter cells and waste to exit them.

Omega 3 functions

  • DHA: Contributes to the maintenance of normal blood triglyceride levels
  • Contributes to brain function
  • Contributes to normal vision
  • EPA, DHA and ALA: Contribute to the maintenance of normal blood pressure
  • Contribute to normal triglyceride concentrations

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is a mineral and a hugely important nutrient. It is present as ?phosphate' in every cell in the body and is a major structural component of cell membranes. The cell membrane serves as a barrier to protect the inside of the cell from the environment and to regulate what can and cannot pass in and out of the cell. Phosphorus also lends strength to bones, making it a major structural component of the skeleton. About 85% of the body's phosphorus is found in bones and teeth. Phosphorus is also central to energy production playing an important role in how our bodies uses carbohydrates and fats, and in the making of proteins used for cell growth, maintenance, and repair.

Phosphorus functions

  • Contributes to the maintenance of bone and teeth
  • Contributes to energy metabolism
  • Contributes to normal function of cell membranes

Potassium

Life would be impossible without potassium. Potassium is part of every cell in the body and supports muscle and brain health. Potassium is an essential mineral which works with sodium to communicate between nerve cells and enable normal muscle contractions (including the heart). This works because molecular pumps pull potassium into cells and push sodium out, creating signals along the nerves to power the contraction of muscles. Additionally, potassium and sodium help the kidneys to work properly to maintain a healthy balance of fluids in the body. Potassium also aids maintenance of normal blood pressure.

Potassium functions

  • Potassium contributes to normal muscular and neurological function
  • Potassium helps maintain normal blood pressure
  • Helps controls the balance of fluids in the body

 

Selenium

Selenium is involved in the manufacture of antioxidant compounds that help cells function properly, support the immune system, and prevent damage from free radicals ? rogue forms of oxygen that damage cells contributing to ageing and disease. Selenium helps the body manufacture selenium-containing proteins called, ?selenoproteins'. Some of these assist vitamins E and C - which are also antioxidants - to provide cells with an even stronger defence against free radicals. Selenium is also involved in the conversion of thyroid hormones to their active forms. Thyroid hormones influence nearly all metabolic processes in the body.

Selenium functions

  • Contributes to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage
  • Contributes to immune function
  • Contributes to normal thyroid function
  • Contributes to normal spermatogenesis
  • Contributes to the maintenance of healthy nails and hair

Zinc

Nearly 100 different enzymes?proteins that initiate chemical reactions in the body?depend on zinc, including those involved in the making of DNA (our cells' blueprint for replication). Zinc contributes to skin repair, immunity, normal fertility and reproduction, DNA synthesis and cell division and provides structure to support proteins such as those found in muscle tissue and cell membranes.

Zinc functions

  • Contributes to immune function
  • Contributes to DNA synthesis and cell division
  • Contributes to the protection of cell constituents from oxidative damage
  • Contributes to the maintenance of normal bone
  • Contributes to normal cognitive function
  • Contributes to fertility and reproduction
  • Contributes to energy metabolism
  • Contributes to maintenance of normal vision
  • Contributes to skin repair
  • Contributes to the maintenance of normal serum testosterone concentrations
  • Contributes to healthy hair and nails
x

Our website uses cookies so that we can make your shopping experience as simple and enjoyable as possible. You can read all about how we use them in our Cookies Policy. To accept this you don't need to do anything just carry on shopping, have fun. Close